Fountains Abbey

This gorgeous site in North Yorkshire is — according to legend — where Robin Hood first met Friar Tuck.  Perhaps somewhere in these shots you’ll notice “Maid Marian.”

img_6126-modified1

img_5827-modified1

 

carolyn-at-fountains_fotor

img_5870-cropped

Advertisements

White Ladies Priory

The ruins of the White Ladies Priory is located in a secluded, haunting spot in the county of Shropshire, West Midlands, straddling the border of England and Wales.  The Catholic women who lived and worked here wore white habits; hence the name of the site.  What you see here is dated to the late 12th century, but local legend says Queen Guinevere retired here following Arthur’s death.  It’s a beautiful spot where I could sit and think and write and take photographs for hours — but way too spooky to hang out after dark!

white-ladies-priory_fotor

Valle Crucis Abbey

This beautiful, quiet site is near Llangollen, Wales.  Legend says the famed Holy Grail was hidden here.  The Grail is part of the legend of King Arthur, whose wife’s name was Guinevere.  I’ve got my own queen, and she’s in this pic.

img_2976-modified

Llangollen, Wales

Llangollen (pronounced tlan-GOT(H)-len) means “chapel of [St.] Collen” (a sixth-century monk).  This town in northeast Wales is among those charming, hidden-away places to which I could easily be persuaded to move.  One of the nice things to do here is take a boat ride along the canal, horse-drawn from shore.

img_2805-modified

Dinas Emrys

The Welsh Dinas Emrys means “Fort of Ambrosius.”  Ambrosius was Arthur’s predecessor in Celtic-controlled regions of Britain in the mid-to-late fifth century.  This particular shot is of a portion of the hillfort at a distance — before I began the somewhat challenging climb to the summit.  Once up there, I doubt I would’ve come down for a very long time, but then my wife likely would have called the authorities thinking I’d had a heart attack in the climb.  Can’t say as I would’ve blamed her.

img_2538-modified

Conwy Castle

Conwy Castle in northern Wales: built in the years 1283-89 by the English King Edward I, as part of his conquest of Wales.  I don’t like bullies or dictators — but sometimes they build cool stuff, which is later really cool to visit.

conwy-castle